Law as Profession or Business?

noun_107566_ccI woke recently to a twitter feed filled with news from the International Legal Ethics Conference in New York. There were a few sessions that really interested me, and I captured the tweets in a series on Storify. (The final in this series of four.)

I recall when first starting in legal practice in 1990 the recognition by the profession that we were in fact a business. Not all accepted this of course. It’s interesting to see the debate continuing some two decades later. In terms of legal education, there are some interesting facets to this argument. How do we continue to teach ethics and professionalism if what we knew as a profession is now no more than a business? (I know that there will be some strong responses to this question…)

You can find this Storify here.

Lawyering in International Security Crises

noun_143465_cc I woke recently to a twitter feed filled with news from the International Legal Ethics Conference in New York. There were a few sessions that really interested me, and I captured the tweets in a series on Storify. (This is the third of four posts.)

As law teachers grapple with the nature and purpose of legal education, it is instructive to consider the diverse roles of the lawyer, including roles that may not have been available when we ourselves graduated. Now, with increasing opportunities for law student and graduate internships with international agencies, the role of lawyer in an international security crisis need not be the stuff of the imagination.

I was interested to see the ILEC twitter feed on this topic, highlighting the ethical and professional issues for lawyers in just these circumstances.

You can find this Storify here.

Lawyering for Good

noun_48290_ccI woke recently to a twitter feed filled with news from the International Legal Ethics Conference in New York. There were a few sessions that really interested me, and I captured the tweets in a series on Storify. (This is the second of four posts.)

There is an emerging scholarship of heroism science that I find intriguing – in particular its potential to explore the nature of lawyering. Interestingly, at the ILEC conference I noticed tweets about the lawyer as hero, notably in strategic human rights litigation. The tweets are brief of course, but the germs of an idea they contain is food for thought.

You can find this Storify here.

Smart Casual Goes Global!

Nat
In June, Natalie Skead took our Smart Casual project to the Chinese University of Hong Kong’s inaugural Conference on Teaching and Learning in Law Conference. With ‘Directions in Legal Education’ as the theme the conference provided a perfect platform to showcase the strides the Smart Casual team is making in supporting sessional law teaching in a rapidly changing legal education landscape.

Further afield, in July, Alex Steel presented Smart Casual to the home of Jazz and Blues, New Orleans. Stay tuned for Alex’s update.

 

 

Globalized Legal Profession

noun_475867_ccI woke recently to a twitter feed filled with news from the International Legal Ethics Conference in New York. There were a few sessions that really interested me, and I captured the tweets in a series on Storify. (The first in a series of four.)
This session concerned the globalized legal profession and in particular, questions about governance and ethics affecting the (not-so-) new global professional order. If you are interested about the background on this, Faulconbridge and Muzio provide an interesting overview. I think that these ideas have important implications for Australian (and international) legal education.
You can find this storify here.